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This is a local copy of the print review, by Zahid Sardar, that appeared:

Sunday, September 10, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER MAGAZINE, page 23

A SECTION OF THE SUNDAY EXAMINER & CHRONICLE

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SUNIL JANAH

Kalart Gallery, 855 Sansome St., S.F., (415) 693-9727.

Clockwise from top left:

  • communal peace rally in Calcutta, E. India, 1947;
  • vilagers during famine in Andhra Pradesh, S. India, 1945;
  • Punjab National Peasant's Conference rally, N. W. India, 1940;
  • Gandhi addressing a rally for communal harmony, Calcutta, 1946;
  • Lord Wavell & Congress leader Rajagopal Acharya, Simla, N. India, 1946;
  • Gypsies, N.W. India, 1940.


Caption: Peace march for communal harmony during Hindu-Muslim riots, Calcutta, 1947.
(c) Sunil Janah 1947-2000
(from photocopy of magazine image)

PHOTOGRAPHY

Parting
SHOTS

Peace march during Hindu-Muslim riots, Calcutta, 1947.
 Sunil Janah 1947-2000

In 1947, rivers of people crossed a point of no return across arbitrary boundary lines between India and Pakistan - both carved out of what was British India. The events that led to this historic passage - reviled even at that time and indefensible in hindsight - are the core subject of a show, "Sunil Janah: Inside India, 1940-1975, Rare Images by India's Legendary Photographer," at the KalArt Gallery in San Francisco, Sept. 14 through Oct. 12.

Disturbing images of bullet-ridden bodies alongside classical portraits of philosophers, Indian leaders, dancers and temples frame a complex image of India.

The nonviolent resolve of Mahatma Gandhi's followers, the ferocity of the armed British Indian police, and famines - the result of diverting grain to the British war effort - were all documented by Janah (now 82, and living in London), who for a while collaborated with Margaret Bourke-White, Life magazine's chronicler based in India. Less formal in style, Janah often took his images alongside Bourke-White, capitalizing on her superior flash equipment.

But his images, whether political or studies of tribal communities, have a different cast than other journalists': "I couldn't align myself with puritanism of any kind. I only documented, from afar, what happened," says Janah.     - Zahid Sardar


Sunday, September 10, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER MAGAZINE, page 23

A SECTION OF THE SUNDAY EXAMINER & CHRONICLE
     
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